CMI - Connert Media, Inc.  
WXYZ Alumni and Staff: Pochert, Terrel L 'Terry' .

Terry Pochert 

American Forces Thailand Network with American Forces Radio and Television Network

AM/FM/TV Engineering, News editing supervisor.

Before joining WXYZ in 1972, Terry worked with the American Forces Radio and Television Network (American Forces Thailand Network).

News:

Sightings:


Vince Wade Remembers and Comments on the Legacy of Bill Bonds

 Bill Bonds - Photo by Terry Pochert
Bill Bonds -
Photo by Terry Pochert

Vince Wade, a long-time investigated reporter with WXYZ-TV and friend of Bill Bonds, writes a very heart-felt commentary on Bill Bonds.  Thousands of comments have been posted about Bill, but not hit home as hard as Vince's message.  Vince Wade writes...

I had the unique and memorable experience of working with Bill Bonds for many years. In the 70s at the height of Bill’s ratings success a Channel 7 news producer made a savvy observation; if you buy his act, the producer said, Bill is the best in the business at what he does. Indeed he was. Detroit bought Bill’s act for a long time. My theory is thousands of Detroit factory rats, as many auto workers described themselves, identified with Bill’s on-air antics. They knew if they had a bully pulpit like Bill that they, too, would wear expensive but often garish clothes, that they, too, would spout off about the news just as they heard Bill doing. In his ad-libbed comments Bonds was doing what they did so many nights at some watering hole where they were having an end-of-shift shot and a shell (liquor with a beer chaser) while watching the news on the TV screen above the bar. Bill was one of them.

Bombastic Billy was smart and well-read. He knew what he was talking about. One night in the 70s during a national political convention ABC News decided to cut away for local news an hour early. Channel 7's late-news producer didn't get the message. Suddenly, with three minutes' warning, ABC anchor Howard K. Smith said they would be cutting away for local news. The Channel 7 newsroom was in total panic. The anchors raced to the studio. The newscast elements were not ready. As Bill put his mic on he said, "I have no scripts. I have no rundown (of the sequence of stories)." The floor director signaled he was now live. Bill said good evening and ad-libbed for two or three minutes while the staff scrambled to get scripts to the anchors and film clips in the projectors. At home, the audience probably thought Bill was ad-libbing just a little more than usual. Bonds was so keen on the business of news that he could tell the audience the news without a script. Very few news anchors then or now could do what Bill did that night.

Bill fought the demons of alcoholism his entire life. He lived his own private hell over the death of his daughter in a collision with a drunk driver. One time we shared a camera crew in Europe for separate assignments and late at night I would hear Bill in the next room loudly chastising himself over his daughter’s death while he paced the room in drunken agony.

There will be many stories told this week about Bill Bonds. But none of them will capture his uniqueness as a communicator. None of the tales will capture his magnetism, his ability to reach through the camera and grab you by your lapels and say, ‘Listen to me. This is news you need to know.’ - Vince Wade

[7109]

1988 Democratic National Convention - WXYZ Team - July 20, 1988

1988 Democratic Naitonal Convention - WXYZ-TV News Team
Greg Karrer, Walter Kraft, Bill Bonds, John Fuller and Mike Kalush - Enjoying a break from a hectic day. - Photo by Terry Pochert 
1988 Democratic National Convention - WXYZ Team - July 20, 1988

[3891]

1988 Democratic Convention - Atlanta Georgia

1988 Democratic Convention, Atlanta, George, Jim Herrington, Bill Bonds, Mike Kalush
Bill Bonds, Jim Herrington, Mike Kalush - Photo by Terry Pochert
WXYZ media folks and fellow journalist covering the 1988 Democratic Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.

[4049]

1988 Democratic National Convention Editing Area

1988 Democratic National Convention - WXYZ Editing Area
1988 Democratic National Convention WXYZ Editing Area - July 20, 1988 - The now famous "Banana in the BVU incident". - Photo by Terry Pochert

[3890]

AFTN - Terry Pochert, engineering, filling in during emergencies.

Terry Pochert - AFTN, Korat, Thailand - Filling in during emergencies.
Terry Pochert, engineering, filling in during several emergencies. 
Fun, but probably better off not behind the microphone.

Terry Pochert - Korat Royal Thail Air Force Base
Terry Pochert - Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base - AFTN Local Station, 1967.

Terry Pochert - TV and FM Antennas at the Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base

[2496]

  A Newscast for the Masses 
Available from Amazon.com

A Newscast for the Masses: The History of Detroit Television Journalism by Tim Kiska - As the chief source of information for many people and a key revenue stream for the country's broadcast conglomerates, local television news has grown from a curiosity into a powerful journalistic and cultural force. In A Newscast for the Masses, Tim Kiska examines the evolution of television news in Detroit, from its beginnings in the late 1940s, when television was considered a "wild young medium," to the early 1980s, when cable television permanently altered the broadcast landscape. Kiska shows how the local news, which was initially considered a poor substitute for respectable print journalism, became the cornerstone of television programming and the public's preferred news source. 

Kiska begins his study in 1947 with the first Detroit television broadcast, made by WWJ-TV. Owned by the Evening News Association, the same company that owned the Detroit News, WWJ developed a credible broadcast news operation as a cross-promotional vehicle for the newspaper. Yet by the late 1960s WWJ was unseated by newcomers WXYZ-TV and WJBK-TV, whose superior coverage of the 1967 Detroit riots lured viewers away from WWJ. WXYZ-TV would eventually become the most powerful news outlet in Detroit with the help of its cash-rich parent company, the American Broadcasting Corporation, and its use of sophisticated survey research and advertising techniques to grow its news audience. Though critics tend to deride the sensationalism and showmanship of local television news, Kiska demonstrates that over the last several decades newscasts have effectively tailored their content to the demands of the viewing public and, as a result, have become the most trusted source of information for the average American and the most lucrative source of profit for television networks.

A Newscast for the Masses is based on extensive interviews with journalists who participated in the development of television in Detroit and careful research into the files of the McHugh & Hoffman consulting firm, which used social science techniques to discern the television viewing preferences of metro Detroiters. Anyone interested in television history or journalism will appreciate this detailed and informative study.


  Detroit Television 
Available from Amazon.com

Detroit broadcasting history is rich with character . . . and characters. It began atop the Penobscot Building on October 23, 1946, when WWDT shot a signal to the convention center, part of a "New Postwar Products Exposition." WWJ-TV offered scheduled programming in June 1947, and WXYZ-TV and WJBK-TV jumped in a year later. The medium has influenced the city's personality and social agenda ever since. Soupy Sales turned getting a pie in the face into an art form. Mort Neff celebrated the state's outdoor charms. George Pierrot showed Detroiters the world. Other beloved personalities include: Milky the Clown, Ed McKenzie, Sonny Eliot, John Kelly, Marilyn Turner, Robin Seymour, Bill Bonds, Dick Westerkamp, Jingles, Bill Kennedy, Lou Gordon, Captain Jolly, Johnny Ginger, Auntie Dee, and many more.



WXYZ: The Lone Ranger/The Green Hornet/Sgt. Preston of the Yukon
WXYZ
Available from Amazon.com


WYXIE Wonder Land: An unauthorized 50-year diary of WXYZ Detroit by Dick Osgood
WXIE Wonderland
Some used copies available through Amazon.com

 


Breaking into Television by Dan Weaver
Breaking Into Television by Dan Weaver

Available from Amazon.com


TV Land - Detroit by Gordon Castelnero
TV Land - Detroit by Gordon Castelnero
Available from Amazon.com


  Detroit Television 
by Tim Kiska 

Detroit Television 
Available from Amazon.com

Detroit broadcasting history is rich with character . . . and characters. It began atop the Penobscot Building on October 23, 1946, when WWDT shot a signal to the convention center, part of a "New Postwar Products Exposition." WWJ-TV offered scheduled programming in June 1947, and WXYZ-TV and WJBK-TV jumped in a year later.

The medium has influenced the city's personality and social agenda ever since. Soupy Sales turned getting a pie in the face into an art form. Mort Neff celebrated the state's outdoor charms. George Pierrot showed Detroiters the world. 

Other beloved personalities include: Milky the Clown, Ed McKenzie, Sonny Eliot, John Kelly, Marilyn Turner, Robin Seymour, Bill Bonds, Dick Westerkamp, Jingles, Bill Kennedy, Lou Gordon, Captain Jolly, Johnny Ginger, Auntie Dee, and many more.


 WXYZ
Available through Amazon.com

WXYZ: The Lone Ranger/The Green Hornet/Sgt. Preston of the Yukon  - Now a collector's item, this hard to get audio CDs contains three hours of audio recordings of the original The Lone Ranger, The Green Hornet and Sgt. Preston of the Yukon.  Originally distributed by Radio Spirits, many third party suppliers through Amazon.com have these available.  If you have a copy, you just might want to hang unto it!


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